Similar to the rule on working conditions, labor laws on statutory monetary benefits do not apply to all employees. As such, unless otherwise stated, the succeeding provisions of laws and rules on statutory monetary benefits apply to employees in all establishments and undertakings whether for profit or not, except to the following:[1]

  • Government employees;
  • Managerial employees;[2]
  • Officers or members of a managerial staff;[3]
  • Field personnel;[4]
  • Members of the family of the employer who are dependent on him for support;
  • Domestic helpers;
  • Persons in the personal service of another; and
  • Workers who are paid by results as determined by the Secretary of Labor in appropriate regulations.

Those that are not exempted above are referred to as “covered employees”.

Statutory monetary benefits are those which the employee is entitled to receive from the employer and the government as required by law.

Table 1
Compliance Guide
[5]

Labor Compliance Guide Statutory Monetary Claimsb - legalaspects.ph

Any or all money claim that an employee may have against the employer prescribes after three years.[6] The language of the law is clear that the prescriptive period is not limited to what may be recovered under the Labor Code, but covers all money claims arising from employer-employee relation.[7]

 

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[1] Ibid. Paragraph 1, Article 82.

[2] Managerial employees are “those whose primary duty consist of the management of the establishment in which they are employed or of a department or subdivision thereof, and to other officers or members of the managerial staff (Paragraph 2, Article 82, Labor Code).

[3] IMPLEMENTING RULES OF BOOK III OF THE LABOR CODE, Section 2(c), Rule I. One is an officer or member of a managerial staff if he perform the following duties and responsibilities: (1) The primary duty consists of the performance of work directly related to management policies of their employer; (2) Customarily and regularly exercise discretion and independent judgment; (3) (i) Regularly and directly assist a proprietor or a managerial employee whose primary duty consists of the management of the establishment in which he is employed or subdivision thereof; or (ii) execute under general supervision work along specialized or technical lines requiring special training, experience, or knowledge; or (iii) execute under general supervision special assignments and tasks; and, (4) Who not devote more than 20 percent of their hours worked in a workweek to activities which are not directly and closely related to the performance of the worked described in Nos. (1), (2), and (3). (Ibid.)

[4] Field personnel are “non-agricultural employees who regularly perform their duties away from the principal place of business or branch office of the employer and whose actual hours of work in the field cannot be determined with reasonable certainty” (Paragraph 3, Article 82, Labor Code). Non-agricultural field personnel are excluded if they regularly perform their duties away from the principal or branch office or place of business of the employer and hose actual hours of work in the field cannot be determined with reasonable certainty (IMPLEMENTING RULES OF BOOK III OF THE LABOR CODE, Section 2(f), Rule I).

[5] Handbook on Workers’ Statutory Monetary Benefits, 2014 edition (pdf), Department of Labor and Employment, Bureau of Working Conditions, Intramuros, Manila.

[6] LABOR CODE. Article 305. The Labor Code does not provide the reckoning point for the 3-year prescriptive period of monetary claims. Thus, applying the Civil Code, the prescriptive period for monetary claims is counted from the day they may be brought (Article 1150, Civil Code).

[7] Amado De Guzman, et al., v. Court of Appeals, et. al., G.R. No. 132257, 12 October 1998.